Hub Adapter Duel (WB vs Daikei)

Hub Adapters!

Hub Adapters!

This blog post is a small bonus addition to my Quick Release Shootout. That one was split over two parts – QR Shootout Part 1 and QR Shootout Part 2. Follow the links if you missed them.

Works Bell shorty vs Daikei Boss.

Works Bell shorty vs Daikei Boss.

The Quick Releases

The Hubs

Click the links above to go straight to a particular quick release review.

Daikei Boss Standard Hub

Daikei Boss thickness

Daikei Boss thickness


(sorry, I managed to not take a photo of it by itself.)

I’ve owned this Daikei Boss since 2002 or 2003. It’s been through a lot. It still looks new and does not feel at all like a part with over 100,000 miles on it. That’s the highest praise I can give a part.

Thickness: 76.3mm / 3.004 in.
Weight: 295g / 10 oz.
Instructions: I don’t remember it coming with any.
Horn retainer ring: Yes, removable.
Hardware Included: Yes.
Airbag Stuff Included: Yes, with OEM connectors.
Bolt Patterns: Both MOMO and Nardi.
Price: $150-200 USD

The Daikei Boss is basically the standard. It’s stamped, plated steel (no welds to fail) and is equal to or greater than OEM quality. It’s not a “Crush style” hub that’s designed to collapse in an accident.

Daikei Boss thickness

Daikei Boss thickness

Wheel to signal stalk distance

Wheel to signal stalk distance

This hub is designed to space an aftermarket steering wheel to an equal distance as whatever OEM steering wheel you’re removing. In other words, the distance from the wheel to the turn signal stalk should not be significantly different than stock.

The Daikei is a great hub. I’ve never found it to be lacking. I’ve had one installed on both of my Miatas.

Works Bell Short Hub

WB Short Hub kit

WB Short Hub kit

The Works Bell Short hub is meant to be used with a standard-thickness Quick Release. It’s as compact as possible. It is not meant to be used by itself without a QR, but it probably could be.

Many thin quick releases (like the NRG and ebay ones reviewed earlier) extend into the hub adapter itself. A short hub like this WB might not have enough interior space to allow the QR to fit inside and mount to the hub.

If you have plans of fitting a slim QR to a short hub, realize that you might have to do some hacking and modification to make things fit.

WB short hub thickness

WB short hub thickness

Thickness: 56mm / 2.214 in.
Weight: 368g / 2 oz.
Instructions: Yes
Horn retainer ring: Yes, removable.
Hardware Included: Yes.
Airbag Stuff Included: Yes, but no OEM connectors.
Bolt Patterns: MOMO only. It’s meant to have a slim QR attached which usually has both bolt patterns.
Price: $200 USD

The Works Bell short hub is made from machined aluminum. The machining is great and there’s no welds to fail. Sometime back around 2010, there were some Works Bell standard-thickness boss hub failures due to their being cast aluminum. I don’t believe that’s been an issue for years, but it’s something to watch out for.

Needless to say, this hub is also not a crush type. The construction is extremely beefy and impressive. It might have a higher ultimate strength than the Daikei.

WB short hub thickness

WB short hub thickness

Since I had it already bolted onto the car, I said “why not?” and took these pix. This hub is TINY.

Wheel to signal stalk distance

Wheel to signal stalk distance

This is barely enough thickness to allow your fingers to pass between the wheel and signal stalk. Driving a few feet in my driveway with the wheel a mile away and squished up against the gauges was hilarious.

WB vs Daikei

Works Bell shorty vs Daikei Boss.

Works Bell shorty vs Daikei Boss.

WB vs Daikei

WB vs Daikei

This really isn’t a fight. Both of these hubs are excellent. Both are of the highest quality. Neither really has any weakness.

If you have no interest in running a quick release, I would definitely suggest the Daikei hub. It’s really a great part. And if you get bored of your car in 20 or 30 years and sell it, you can likely resell the Daikei for about what you paid originally. This hub also works quite well with a slim quick release.

If you want to use a standard thickness quick release, the Works Bell shorty is highly recommended. But if you wanted to add a QR later… you will likely not be happy using the WB shorty by itself. You could always get an inexpensive spacer to bring the steering wheel closer to factory distance.

Quick Releases

Did someone say Quick Release? If you missed out on the QR shootout, go check it out! There’s videos, measurements, and around 50 photos.

Quick Release Shootout

If you made it to the end of all three posts, you are awesome.

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  • Brad says:

    These quick releases still seem like voodoo to me, having never played with one before. I like the idea though, as a means of vehicle security. Kinda hard to drive a car without a wheel…

    Anyway, good to see you posting again.

  • Samuel says:

    Have you ever had any experience with the tall Works Bell adapter? I know you mentioned the failures of the earlier ones. I am debating between it and the Daikei, and I can’t see much reason to justify the extra cash for the Daikei.

    • revlimiter says:

      Unfortunately, I’ve never touched one or seen it in person. You should ask whatever shop you’re planning to purchase the tall WB hub from about it. Find out how it’s currently being constructed and if they’ve seen many failures. If it’s still cast metal, I’d avoid it. You want something machined like the WB short hub or welded like the Daikei.

  • Spencer says:

    Where did you find the Works Bell short hub for na’s? I can only find it listed for nb’s.

    For example: https://miataroadster.com/works-bell/works-bell-steering-wheel-hub-adaptors-all-models-in-stock-now/wb910s/i-409016.aspx

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